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Monthly Archives

August 2016

Fall Furnace Maintenance

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It's time to get your heating system / furnace ready for the fall and winter months! With September just a few days away, now is the time to start thinking about getting that furnace ready to go for the colder months. The last thing anyone wants to do is turn on their furnace on the first cold night of the season only to find that it doesn't work. Here are some things you should do to start getting ready for the colder fall and winter months. Schedule a furnace tune up Being a part of the Sears Heating & Cooling service club helps automate this process as we will contact you to schedule your fall tune up. Maintenance will help identify any issues that may be of concern for the coming season. Replace your furnace filter Dirty filters are one of the leading causes of furnace and air conditioner breakdowns. Make sure to check yours at least every 30 days and change accordingly. Maintain area around your heat pump If you have a heat pump, it's important to keep the area around it clear of debris so that it can breathe properly. There should be at least 18 inches of clearance around the unit. A unit that is not clear of debris will have to work harder and ultimately cost your more in terms of energy. Add insulation to your attic By adding insulation to your attic, you help keep the warm air in and the cool air out. It is...
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HVAC Maintenance

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You probably hear us talk a lot about regular maintenance for your heating and cooling system.  Maintenance is important to keep your system running at peak performance and avoid an hvac repair.  You should get an air conditioner tune-up before the heat of summer hits and a furnace tune-up before the cold of winter blows in.  We know that you are busy and sometimes forget to have tune-ups done and that is why we offer a Service Club. As a Service Club member, you will receive either an annual or semi-annual service on your heating and or air conditioning equipment and a 10% discount on future repairs. When we come out to your home we check the following things: MECHANICAL SYSTEM: This is a complete inspection service of all moving and electrical components in your system. SAFETY SYSTEM: This is a complete inspection service of all safeties in your system such as combustion/Ignition/Venting as well as power protection components in your system. PERFORMANCE SYSTEM: This is a service that will test the overall efficiency of your system. Included in this service, we will test the refrigerant system, the air flow system, and the combustion system for a maximum performance output. WHAT THIS PLAN PROVIDES FOR YOU: YOUR MONTHLY ENERGY COSTS ARE REDUCED –a well-maintained and clean system will operate more efficiently and use less energy. PEACE OF MIND – You know your equipment is well maintained and operating efficiently. YOU SAVE MONEY – Receive substantial savings on maintenance checks and repair calls. EXTENDS...
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Types of Air Conditioners

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Air conditioning, or cooling, is more complicated than heating. Instead of using energy to create heat, air conditioners use energy to take heat away. The most common air conditioning system uses a compressor cycle (similar to the one used by your refrigerator) to transfer heat from your house to the outdoors. Central air conditioners and heat pumps are designed to cool the entire house. In each system, a large compressor unit located outside drives the process; an indoor coil filled with refrigerant cools air that is then distributed throughout the house via ducts. Heat pumps are like central air conditioners, except that the cycle can be reversed and used for heating during the winter months. With a central air conditioner, the same duct system is used with a furnace for forced warm-air heating. In fact, the central air conditioner typically uses the furnace fan to distribute air to the ducts. Mini-split systems, very popular in other countries, can be an attractive retrofit option for room additions and for houses without ductwork, such as those using hydronic heat (see the heating section). Like conventional central air conditioners, mini-splits use an outside compressor/condenser and indoor air handling units. The difference is that each room or zone to be cooled has its own air handler. Each indoor unit is connected to the outdoor unit via a conduit carrying the power and refrigerant lines. Indoor units are typically mounted on the wall or ceiling. The major advantage of a ductless mini-split is its flexibility...
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How Air Conditioners Work

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Ever wondered how that big mechanical box outside of your home that keeps your house cool actually works? Well wonder no more! The actual process air conditioners use to reduce the ambient air temperature in a room is based on a very simple scientific principle. The rest is achieved with the application of a few clever mechanical techniques. Actually, an air conditioner is very similar to another appliance in your home -- the refrigerator. Air conditioners don't have the exterior housing a refrigerator relies on to insulate its cold box. Instead, the walls in your home keep cold air in and hot air out. Air conditioners use refrigeration to chill indoor air, taking advantage of a remarkable physical law: When a liquid converts to a gas (in a process called phase conversion), it absorbs heat. Air conditioners exploit this feature of phase conversion by forcing special chemical compounds to evaporate and condense over and over again in a closed system of coils. The compounds involved are refrigerants that have properties enabling them to change at relatively low temperatures. Air conditioners also contain fans that move warm interior air over these cold, refrigerant-filled coils. In fact, central air conditioners have a whole system of ducts designed to funnel air to and from these serpentine, air-chilling coils. Also, because temperature is a key component of relative humidity, reducing the temperature of a volume of humid air causes it to release a portion of its moisture. That's why there are drains and moisture-collecting pans...
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